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Comments (9)

  • Project car coming

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    I'm pretty sure the Toyota tercel had a production 6 speed in at least 84.

  • Alan Franklin

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    The 4WD model Tercel (great car, BTW) did have a six speed box, though for some reason the 959 is generally credited as the first. From what I understand the Tercel's first was very, very low, to the point of being useless off-road, where "G" in a 959 is also quite low but useable on the street, albeit just.

  • Alan Franklin

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    Err. "being useless anywhere but off-road" is what I meant to say.

  • Project car coming

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    Haha, I was going to say you have never been off roading with one. I pulled a few pickups out of the ditches and back roads with my '88. I never fell behind in the back roads (most were more overgrown exploration trails then roads) of the Yukon. I was thinking that the 4WD Tercel didn't get credit for the first six speed is because it would only go into EL in 4WD. It was a really great car.

  • UncleWalty

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    There was a recent Top Gear segment in which Hammond did a similar retrospective of the 959 and F40.

  • Ae Neuman

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    "While both cars utilized twin turbos, the F40’s were parallel whereas the Porsche’s were sequential in order to reduce drag."

    drag not lag ?

    ;)

  • Alan Franklin

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    Oops! Thanks, Ae, that's obviously a typo, we'll fix it.

  • Leucea Alexandru

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    Nothing was faster on the road in the 80's, as this Porsche 959 and of course, the Ferrari F40...a link to the Top Gear review:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mFleLfedrU

    Meantime, rich-and-famous folks everywhere scrambled to be among the few chosen for 959 ownership. Tennis star Boris Becker was refused (too young and inexperienced, Porsche said), but he also happens to be the man who was once clocked doing 326kph (204mph) on an Italian motorway in his Porsche 959 at the age of 20.
    Having the money wasn't enough, however. To qualify, you had to be a Porsche owner and promise not to sell your 959 for at least six months. You also had to be willing to travel. Sales and service were handled only from the Stuttgart factory.
    You were out of luck entirely if you lived in America and drove on public roads. Porsche reneged on a promise to certify 959s to U.S. standards, and a later plan to sell 26 as "racers". So even the wealthiest and most influential Americans could only dream of owning this engineering marvel, the car that had won the grueling Paris-Dakar rally not once but twice (1984 and '86, in competition 961 trim).

  • Sean Morris

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    While both cars utilized twin turbos, the F40’s were parallel whereas the Porsche’s were sequential in order to reduce lag

    Actually not technically correct. Adding to the complexity, the 959 is parallel and sequential turbocharged.

    The turbocharger/engine setup was very unique. Below 4,000 rpms all the exhaust gases were fed to a single turbo, between 4000 and 4200 rpms the second turbo started to be brought into the mix. Above 4200 rpms, the turbos operated in parallel to provide up to 0.9 bar of boost. Fairly complicated, but they got the results they wanted with 1980's turbo technology. They added a lot of area under the curve, eliminating a a lot of the "turbo lag" that gave the Porsche turbo a bad reputation.

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