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Comments (10)

  • Rip Curl

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    The Fulvia had some interesting engineering and was not a bad looking car to boot. I have always lusted after an orange one with all the vintage rally markings on it.

  • Dan Woodward

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    A Fulvia is on my must own list.

    Pretty, interesting, fun and criminally undervalued is a winning combination.

  • John Teyssier

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    I love the Fulvia, looking for one now. In my research I came across the worst modified Fulvia I have ever seen. Look away now....

    http://www.leboncoin.fr/voitures/452383115.htm?ca=12_s

  • Alan Franklin

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    I shed a tear.

  • carscribe

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    The Fulvia sedan at the top of the page brought back memories - it was my first car. Mind you, when dad said he'd bought me a Fulvia, I had a slightly different vision of what he would arrive home in…

  • ACFowles

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    A powerful opening sentence that should be compulsory reading for anyone with a driving licence.

  • Andrew Adamides

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    I had one of these - it was great! Also, thanks to the miracle of front wheel drive and torque-steer, if you wanted to reverse round a bend, all you needed to do was tilt the steering wheel ever so slightly to the left or right with one finger, let out the clutch very slowly and the car would do the rest itself.

  • Andrew Adamides

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    Whoops, clicked submit too soon. It should also be added that the Fulvia Coupe was remarkably long-lived, testament to how great it was. When Fiat bought Lancia and introduced the Beta Coupe, that was supposed to be the Fulvia's replacement. However, the Fulvia Coupe sold so well that it went on alongside the Beta Coupe until 1977 in 1.3S form.

    And while everyone focuses on the 1.6HF cars, the 1.3 is no slouch. In fact with its twin carbs, it accelerates amazingly fast for such a tiny-displacement engine. I used to outrun E36 BMW 3-Series in mine at traffic lights.

  • alfavirusnz

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    It is the quality of the components and the fascinating mechanical design that is particularly attractive to me. The fact that it works so well is icing on the cake. Engineers ruled Lancia so what was the best solution, in their view, won out - to hell with cost and what they would sell the car for.
    They would be one of the very best engineered cars of their era. Reason for the V4 by the way was compactness and more importantly smoothness, and they are certainly smoother than an Alfa inline twincam 4 for example. Each engine capacity had a difference in cylinder angle because the engineers believed it was necessary in the pursuit of excellence and if there was a believed superior solution or even a superior fastening these cars got it anyway. Not commercially sensible these days but there were enough buyers then who appreciated quality to keep Lancia going then until the late `60`s. In our collection we are lucky enough to have two, a 2C Berlina, and a series 3 coupe amongst the Alfas, Fiat 500`s and DS Citroen. If you are into cars you have to have at least one pre Fiat Lancia.

  • Alan Franklin

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    Very well put.

    Sounds like a wonderful menagerie you've put together.