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History

Buying a Mercedes-Benz 300 SL “Gullwing”…in 1970

Buying a Mercedes-Benz 300 SL “Gullwing”…in 1970

By Simeone Museum / 16 Apr 2015 / 10 Comments Read More

Back in 1970, with no Internet or regular magazines with large selections of collector cars, we often scoured the Sunday New York Times. It had an old car section full of great stuff, and most of it was local in the Northeast.

I would read it religiously, but most of the cars were out of reach. There were plenty of Duesenbergs, but they were all over $50,000, and a medical student’s salary back then did not go very far. What other options did I have?

Selling the Future: The Story of the Davis Divan

Selling the Future: The Story of the Davis Divan

By Forest Casey / 15 Apr 2015 / 3 Comments Read More

And as thousands upon thousands of American soldiers began returning home from the Great War, the market for domestic automobiles was ripe for revolution. Enter: Glen Gordon “Gary” Davis.

Unlike Preston Tucker, Davis had no hands-on experience building cars. What Davis had was years of experience selling used cars during the war in his home state of Indiana. Like so many before and since, Davis migrated to southern California with dreams of fame and fortune.

How’d that work out? Well…

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The Borgward Brand Is Back

The Borgward Brand Is Back

By Jennifer Clark / 26 Mar 2015 / 4 Comments Read More

With Borgward promising to revive the brand with an SUV concept ready for this fall, Petrolicious thought the time was right for a closer look at post-war Germany’s most intriguing car maker. Before it was forced to shut its gates in 1961, Borgward employed more than 23,000 people and made one of the fastest mid-sized cars on the road, the Isabella TS. It invented the mid-sized sports sedan years before BMW did. But it hasn’t made a car since. So what happened?

The Hollywood Sign is a Special Type of Beacon

The Hollywood Sign is a Special Type of Beacon

By Benjamin Shahrabani / 23 Mar 2015
5 Comments

Originally erected in 1923, the Hollywood Sign, comprising nine white letters, each 45-feet tall, have become an icon, and helped define a city, and an industry. The sign has been featured in popular culture, and dozens of movies. However, what you may not know is that it wasn’t originally created to promote the movies, or Los Angeles. So how did the world’s most famous sign come to be?

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More than Luck: the Story of Alfa Romeo’s Quadrifoglio Badge

More than Luck: the Story of Alfa Romeo’s Quadrifoglio Badge

By Michael Banovsky / 16 Mar 2015 / 1 Comment Read More

At the turn of the 20th century, motor racing was an incredibly dangerous sport that often claimed the lives of its most talented drivers. From the crucible of early motorsport competition, one symbol in particular signifies the unbreakable spirit of drivers who raced on the very edge in search of fame and fortune: the Quadrifoglio four-leaf clover emblem.

A Look at the Rare and Racy Nardi-Danese 6C

A Look at the Rare and Racy Nardi-Danese 6C

By Benjamin Shahrabani / 10 Mar 2015 Read More

With a career spent rubbing shoulders with Ferrari, Lancia, and other great marques, Enrico Nardi found himself driving and engineering iconic Italian cars. Using his own ideas, however, Nardi was able to create this stunning race car years before his company would turn to steering wheels and performance accessories.

Lamborghini’s Founder Was a Man Obsessed with Purposeful Perfection

Lamborghini’s Founder Was a Man Obsessed with Purposeful Perfection

By Ryan Connolly / 9 Mar 2015 / 1 Comment Read More

Ferruccio Lamborghini was a blue-collar visionary, the type of man who all Petrolisti aspire to be. He built fast cars, made a bunch of money, and never even needed to incur a dime of student loan debt to do so. Ferruccio Lamborghini's lasting legacy stems from his work as a supercar builder, but despite his name adorning the rumps of Miuras and Aventadors from Bogota to Beijing, Lamborghini Automobili was simply the cherry on top of Ferruccio’s empire.

Alfa Romeo at Its Very Best: the Alfetta 158/159

Alfa Romeo at Its Very Best: the Alfetta 158/159

By Jacopo Villa / 5 Mar 2015
6 Comments

Hard as it may be for young Petrolisti to believe, Alfa Romeo once sat atop the world of Formula 1 racing. Back in the days when "sex was safe and motor racing was dangerous," this Milanese automaker briefly overcame its underdog status and became a source of headaches for its European rivals, taking home Formula 1 championships in 1950 and 1951.

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Simplicity Led to the Fiat 500’s Unintentional Charm

Simplicity Led to the Fiat 500’s Unintentional Charm

By Ronald Ahrens / 25 Feb 2015
8 Comments

The original Fiat 500, Italy’s first people’s car, was produced from 1936 to 1955. As The New York Times explained, it was “lovingly dubbed by Italians 'Topolino,' or Mickey Mouse, for its toy-store looks and roller-skate wheels.” And yet, as Ronald Ahrens writes, the 500 somehow transcended its quotidian duties, running in track events, hillclimbs, endurance rallies, and would go on to serve as Karl Abarth's platform for fame and riches.

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Helplessly Cool Mastroianni Defined Style

Helplessly Cool Mastroianni Defined Style

By Benjamin Shahrabani / 23 Feb 2015 / 1 Comment Read More

An Italian actor who rose to prominence in the 1960's, Marcello Mastroianni became a star within Italian cinema in the 1950's after a stint in the theater, when he caught the attention of Federico Fellini. Mastroianni acted in some of Fellini's biggest movies, including La Dolce Vita and 8 1/2.

How the General Lee Became a Small Screen Icon

How the General Lee Became a Small Screen Icon

By Ronald Ahrens / 19 Feb 2015 / 5 Comments Read More

Even people who have never seen The Dukes of Hazzard have a good idea what The General Lee can do. Its iconic image is fixed in our minds. Like the Model T in The Absent-Minded Professor and the rebuilt Grand Prix racing car in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, this Dodge Charger can fly.