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Comments (9)

  • Leucea Alexandru

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    And it has one of the coolest features ever mounted on a car, the pop-up headlights. Such a shame no manufacturer dares to bring back something so beautiful for the eye to see. It always felt like a car was alive, just opening its eyes and waking up from sleep, when i saw those headlamps popping as a child. It was mesmerizing.

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  • Matthew Lange

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    Pedestrian crash regulations have effectively outlawed pop up headlamps on new cars in the US and EU.

    Why the flat 12 Ferraris have been relatively undervalued in the market has intrigued me for a number of years and I even blogged about the Testarossa's predecessor the Boxer being undervalued a couple of years ago. My thoughts on the subject haven't changed really since then. The Testarossa is certainly a more usable car than the Boxer especially if you are tall, but it is not as practical and more difficult to drive than the 550 that replaced it.

  • Logan Tanner

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    How can the visual appeal of the TR's Pininfarina styling even be brought into question? Personally, I find the TR a SIGNIFICANTLY better looking car than the Daytona and the Daytona is considered a classic commanding a million plus dollars. Any issue that some might have with the TR's styling will be unfounded in 10-20 years time. This is a bold, V12 Ferrari. It's not polarizing like a Countach, but it does have a style all it's own.

    Sorry, got a little intense about that.

  • Alan Franklin

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    I personally love it, I'm just acknowledging that many don't. Not sure it compares to the Daytona, that's an "apples and oranges" scenario to me.

  • Steve Fitz

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    I agree. The style is unimpeachable. That part of the write-up made me pause.

  • Terrence Dorsey

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    Yes, please focus your attention on the Ferraris of the '80s and leave 308 GT4 and 400i prices alone until I can get one.

  • Andreas Lavesson

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    Being a child of the 80's myself, I can't but agree with you, these will be in high demand in a couple of years. I even had a pillowcase with the Testarossa on it and every time I used it, I would try very hard to dream about owning one. Unfortunately, it didn't work all the time and the dreams have yet to come true, so I guess I'd better keep dreaming.

    Personally, I think that the Testarossa looks miles better than the 512 TR (and the F512 LM just looks wrong without the pop-ups). As you said, it's got a definitive 80's styling too it (I don't mean that in a negative way fyi.) and I think that "the more 80's" the better. Fortunately though, I'm not a fan of the single mirror cars (even though that's precisely what my pillowcase had), so I guess I'd be wanting one of those that are among the least sought after.

    I was incredibly intrigued when you compared it to the Porsche 928 in terms of price. It seems like they're at least not very far off of the Testarossa in the states. However, over here the Testarossa is more or less exactly as expensive as the ones over there, but a 928 in as good condition as you'll be able to get is a whooping 1/3 off of the price! Even the Mondial T, which is more or less the cheapest Ferrari you could get your hands on, is an additional $15k and the 308 GT4 and 400 (awesome cars by the way), as Terrence mentioned, are also an additional $15k-$25k in comparison to the 928. I guess I really "should" buy a Porsche instead.

  • Renbry

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    I think the Porsche 928's market value is polluted with too many bad examples. Until the 928 is as rare as something like the Testarossa (Wikipedia says there are almost 10x as many 928s made vs Testarossa) it's value will stay down (at bargain level!!)

    There are some late model 928 GTS for sale close to $90k but most people are happy with a $10-20k example...

  • Andreas Lavesson

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    Yeah, you are probably right. There are quite a few pretty run down examples out there, and as you said, they are abundant in comparison. The fact that some people consider it to be "not a real Porsche" and doesn't realize that it's got a quite potent V8 might also have something to do with it.

    However, the ones that can be had at 1/3 over here (about 20-25 grand) are the late model 928 GTS with some 75-90k miles on them, unfortunately most of them with an automatic. I realized that the 90 grand cars have about half that mileage, so these are not as big of a bargain as I first though. None the less, they seem pretty decent and 75-90k miles is manageable if they've been looked after properly.