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karmann ghia

Why the Karmann Ghia Type 34 Is Collectable

Why the Karmann Ghia Type 34 Is Collectable

By Petrolicious Productions / 9 Jun 2014 / 4 Comments Read More

The Collector is a weekly series produced in association with Gear Patrol.

The Type 34 is stately and is certainly more rare than the Karmann Ghia Type 14. But it's also far roomier than the Type 14 with more luggage space, as well. In contrast to what you might expect, the Type 34 is actually faster than the Type 14 too! You see, the Type 34 was fitted with a 1.5L engine, whilst its sibling made do with a smaller engine until 1967.

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VW’s Other Karmann Ghia Put a Memorable Face on Luxury

VW’s Other Karmann Ghia Put a Memorable Face on Luxury

By Alan Franklin / 7 Aug 2013
1 Comment

Replaced by the Porsche 914 in 1969, the 34 was seemingly destined to be eclipsed by other VW family machines. It’s legacy then is one of a controversial orphan, not exactly the stuff of legends, but as demonstrated by the beautiful car featured here, easily a car worthy of a second look.

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A Good Karmann Ghia Makes a Solid if Unlikely Investment

A Good Karmann Ghia Makes a Solid if Unlikely Investment

By Alan Franklin / 14 Jun 2013
3 Comments

First launched in 1955 as a coupe, then two years later as a convertible, the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia was essentially a Beetle with a sexier body. Designed by Luigi Segre under the banner of Carrozzeria Ghia, and built by German coachbuilder Karmann, the Ghia helped VW appeal to a broader audience with minimal financial investment. Today, the Karmann Ghia’s among the most collectible of air-cooled VWs, and seen by many as a kind of poor-man’s Porsche 356.

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Karmann Ghia: The Pussycat

Karmann Ghia: The Pussycat

By Petrolicious Productions / 6 Dec 2012

What the Karmann Ghia lacked in performance, it made up with a genuine sense of humor.  There, the Karmann Ghia excelled.  In an era of muscle cars with outrageous tail fins, larger than life bumpers, and blinding chrome, Manhattan-based ad men Doyle, Dane, and Bernbach had the anti-sports car to sell.

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