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  • Guest (gbgary)

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    I think it was 1970 and I was coming over the Hollywood Hills back into the valley when one of these Japanese cars pulled up alongside of my less than year old TR6. He appeared to rev his engine, as if it were some kind of challenge, and I smiled at the temerity of this guy for what I thought was foolish bravado. Well, he revved again and this time I thought I would teach this boy a lesson. The light turned green, I blasted forth and as I slammed it into second, I looked up and I could barely read his license plate.............To this day I always remember that humbling moment whenever I see a 240Z.

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  • Mike McKinnon

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    I'd actually trade my '82 GTV6 for a clean 240Z. I have always wanted one, ever since I was a wee monkey.

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  • In some ways it’s like the Japanese Porsche 911, except that they were far more affordable when new and enjoyed legendary Japanese reliability.

    And also except that the engine is in the front AND the 240Z is a true twos eter whereas the 911 is a 2+2...like the 260 and 280Z 2+2s !

    So in fact, the 240Z is NOTHING like a 911 !

    I love that you talk of Zs but please, why not consult the owners the club runners, basically thsoe that know the cars better than most and get the facts right.........please !

    Thanks.

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  • Adam Fairfax

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    i've just finished a five year build of my Australian delivered RHD five speed 240Z. Having just sold a 1974 2.7 MFI Carrera, and 911 Turbo Carrera before that, I can say with some authority that the little early Z's are 'freaking fast' and the handling (with a set of Koni sport shocks, and semi slick Dunlop race tyres) absolutely trounces any 911 i've owned. In part, this has to do with the fact that factory made 240Z's with 50/50 weight distribution, and the early models were not much above 2300pd (~1,070kg), which given the online six, did and still does make for a very fast ride. Admittedly, mine now has triple OER's, but all else is original.

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    from Sydney NSW, Australia
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  • Guest (Iulian Maciuca)

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    Hello Adam, do you have any documentation regarding the install of the triple OER carbs? I am thinking about doing the same to my 240Z in Switzerland. I would higly appreaciate if you could share any piece of information about istalling these OER triples. Thank you very much.

    from Mendrisio, Switzerland
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  • Pete Brissing

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    I have owned an early Series 1 Z for 17 years now and in addition to the accolades of good looking, fast, great handling, etc. mentioned by other commenters, I must add that the car has been ultra reliable. This, in spite of sitting outside for some years, albeit under a good cover, while the Porsche occupied the garage. The P car is gone now and the Z has taken its proper place in the garage and doesn't look to be moving out any time soon. It is a 44 year old car (engine not yet rebuilt with 132K) that I wouldn't hesitate to drive anywhere.

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  • Kerrigan

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    Still an awesome car to this day and a classic in it's own right. A joy to own and drive. 1971 FairladyZ-L

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  • Vince Cox

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    Its always great to see any blog make a post about the venerable S30 Datsun 240-Z's. Thanks for that! I've been restoring these old girls since the late 70's with joy. There seems to still be a lot of misinformation going around about them but its getting more dialed in thanks in part by aficionado's like Carl Beck and other enthusiast owners. Thanks Carl! I look forward to the S30 gaining in well done restored and completed themed cars for us all to enjoy and drive. When I see a younger person driving one and obviously giving some care and thought to its execution instead of just using it as a surviving beater, I always give them props and encouragement.

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  • Andy Smith

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    Sean Dezart: a couple things to counter your comments (from months ago). Yes, I am late. First, the 260 and 280's were mostly sold as 2 seaters despite the 2+2 option. Also, the 240 was compared to the 911 back in the day. They attracted a similar sort of enthusiast and shared many things in common. Even though the Porsche is a 2+2, that doesn't make the car radically different from the 240. Datsun was indeed setting their sights not only on the MG, Triumphs, and Fiats of the day, but Porsche as well. If you wanted to get very particular, the Z was closely rivaled by the 914, thus closer to the price class of the 240. All in all, the 240 and 911 are fair to rival each other.

    You speak of consulting car clubs and the "experts". With all due respect I'll bet you that most Z car club members would justify comparisons with the 911......Especially those who remember the introduction of the Z car. The information in this article is legitimate.

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  • Mark Carpenter

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    Here is one of the last Series-1 240Z's ever built. Build date is January 1971, so although sold as a 1971, it is in fact a series-1. Has headers and a street cam, a few other retro-mod upgrades. But original matching engine and body, nice ride makes me smile each time I take off. http://youtu.be/ii0Z8UkPzOk

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